new kid in town: looking for new stuff to read

Dudes and Duettes, this be your new teacher coming at you from hot and humid Barranquilla. Maria Jose is safe and sound in the States now and was able to hand over control of the blog site. Please feel free and comfortable to continue blogging and contributing as much as possible. I can’t promise to read everything instantly, but I’ll do my best. So please, please write. Practice makes perfect.

Cheers.

ūüėÄ

How To Prepare For A Debate

Meine lieblings! (I think that’s German¬†for My dears or something like that ūüėČ)¬†

As you very well know next class there will a debate about capital punishment. I looked up some info on how to prepare for debates since I want you guys to very-well prepared for your debate since you will be graded.

I found a gazillion websites with lots of tips and ideas for prepping for a debate, but I decided to pick one up and post about it. (Yes! I’m lazy too!)

But as you very well know, I am very kind person, so¬†I pasted on the bottom of this post all the links to other websites concerning this topic, ¬†in case you’re as lazy as¬†I am and don’t want to bother googling this stuff.

Enjoy!

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How to prepare for a debate

Chances are at some time in your life you have had a debate. It may have been at school or work or even at home. Were you prepared for the debate? Here are some steps to take to prepare yourself better for your next debate.

Step 1

The number one key to preparing for a debate is putting the time into researching your side of the argument. Having an opinion isn’t enough to be effective in a debate. You need to be able to have strong supporting materials for your side of the debate.

Step 2

Make sure you include relevant facts that many others would not have already known. People want to hear facts that they didn’t already know. The more related relevant facts you include the stronger your presentation becomes.

Step 3

Learn how to effectively communicate your positions. You may have a great position on a certain subject, but if you can’t effectively communicate that to an audience it won’t matter in a debate. Practice in front of others and even in front of a mirror. Make sure you look confident because no one will buy an argument from someone who isn’t confident themselves.

Step 4

¬†¬†Train yourself to fully respect the other debater. Nothing turns someone off more than a debater who just won’t allow the other person to get in a word. Even if you are completely convinced you are right, you must give the other person time to speak their mind as well.

Step 5

Prepare to have a rebuttal to the arguments that the other person will make. Many times you can know what they will say ahead of time and prepare yourself with facts that contradict their argument.

Taken from: http://www.ehow.com/how_4490531_prepare-debate.html

MORE INFO HERE:

http://www.learnquebec.ca/en/content/curriculum/social_sciences/features/debate/students/process/student_prep.html

http://www.wowessays.com/dbase/ag1/xaj67.shtml

http://www.cbv.ns.ca/sstudies/titanic/lessons/comm3.htm

Types of Paragraphs

¬†It is¬†really important¬† to understand the functions of each type of paragraph in order to help you write coherent, cohesive and¬†well-structured compositions. As I promised, here is further information¬†about¬†paragraphs.I took it from a very¬†comprehensive website. I will paste the link at the bottom. ¬†If you guys google the subject, you would find a great deal of information on this topic. I am just sharing what I found the most interesting, but I’m sure there are¬† many other useful websites out there for you. You just have to do a little research.

I will soon be posting some information on how to prepare effectively for class debates too.

M

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Seven Types of Paragraphs

In order to write coherent essays, students must first learn about the functions of various paragraphs. Most paragraphs will have several functions to fulfill at a time; it is important to know under what circumstances their functions can be conjoined. The following list contains explanations about the content and style of different paragraphs.

Narration Paragraph

Narration paragraphs are most distinctively used in fiction. As such, they will contain all necessary components of action development: protagonist, setting, goal, obstacle, climax and resolution. Writing a narration paragraph requires, consequently, sequential order and chronology. There are many descriptive elements included into the body of a narration paragraph but, if composed correctly, the paragraph will feature much more action than depiction.

Exposition Paragraph

Often times, this kind of a paragraph is used as a component of other types. It’s created in order to clarify or explain a problem or a phenomenon. Writing exposition paragraphs requires strict focus on evidence and objective language. It can contain elements of comparison and contrast or cause and effect writing Рboth facilitate accurate exposition of its subject-matter.

Definition Paragraph

Definition paragraphs are used in order to explain the meaning, origin and function of things. They are used both in academic writing and in fiction. To write a definition paragraph, writers should concentrate on the role of its subject in the context of the whole essay and list comparisons as well as examples accordingly.

Classification Paragraph

Writing a classification paragraph takes a slightly varied approach. It should rely on both defining and comparing. Writers should classify the subject of the paragraph in a specific context providing comparisons to corresponding ideas. Classification can be performed on multiple levels ‚Äď semantic (comparing different meanings of things), linguistic (using vocabulary to show contrast), and more.

Description Paragraph

Preferably, description paragraphs should concentrate on action (verbs), rather than sensations (adverbs and adjectives). Writers should assume the role of readers whose idea of the described events is, in entirety, constructed by the paragraph content. Description paragraphs should be detailed, clear, and render the represented reality chronologically.

Process Analysis Paragraph

It, usually, takes the form of a how-to paragraph which guides readers through a process or action to be performed. It’s very concise and uses formal, non-descriptive vocabulary. It should be written in chronological order which accounts for subsequent actions.

Persuasion Paragraph

Persuasion paragraphs require exhortatory and dynamic language. They are aimed at persuading others into taking a particular action or adopting certain point of view. They should be devoid of descriptive content and, instead, rely on the imperative mode.

 Taken from:

http://academicwriting.suite101.com/article.cfm/seven_types_of_paragraphs

Writing Paragraphs

write-with-usHere’s a quick review of what we talked about last class concerning the structure of an effective paragraph. I will be posting more on types of paragraphs soon.

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Parts of a Paragraph

 

Topic Sentence

What is the topic sentence?
The topic sentence is the first sentence in a paragraph.

What does it do?
It introduces the main idea of the paragraph.

How do I write one?
Summarize the main idea of your paragraph. Indicate to the reader what your paragraph will be about.

Example:

There are three reasons why Canada is one of the best countries in the world. First, Canada has an excellent health care system. All Canadians have access to medical services at a reasonable price. Second, Canada has a high standard of education. Students are taught by well-trained teachers and are encouraged to continue studying at university. Finally, Canada’s cities are clean and efficiently managed. Canadian cities have many parks and lots of space for people to live. As a result, Canada is a desirable place to live.

Supporting Details

What are supporting sentences?
They come after the topic sentence, making up the body of a paragraph.

What do they do?
They give details to develop and support the main idea of the paragraph.

How do I write them?
You should give supporting facts, details, and examples.

Example:

There are three reasons why Canada is one of the best countries in the world. First, Canada has an excellent health care system. All Canadians have access to medical services at a reasonable price. Second, Canada has a high standard of education. Students are taught by well-trained teachers and are encouraged to continue studying at university. Finally, Canada’s cities are clean and efficiently managed. Canadian cities have many parks and lots of space for people to live. As a result, Canada is a desirable place to live.

Closing Sentence

What is the closing sentence?
The closing sentence is the last sentence in a paragraph.

What does it do?
It restates the main idea of your paragraph.

How do I write one?
Restate the main idea of the paragraph using different words.

Example:

There are three reasons why Canada is one of the best countries in the world. First, Canada has an excellent health care system. All Canadians have access to medical services at a reasonable price. Second, Canada has a high standard of education. Students are taught by well-trained teachers and are encouraged to continue studying at university. Finally, Canada’s cities are clean and efficiently managed. Canadian cities have many parks and lots of space for people to live. As a result, Canada is a desirable place to live.

 Taken from:

http://www2.actden.com/Writ_Den/Tips/paragrap/index.htm

How To Speak In Public To A Group

Some people are terrified to speak in public or in front of a group.¬†It¬†really can be¬†daunting at¬†times. However, these simple steps can help you do better at it, even if you don’t like it. Here’s how:

1. Know your subject
It is always easier to speak about something you know. For example, it would be easier for me to speak about baseball, a game I have played and watched since childhood, than to speak about cricket, which I have only seen played a few times.

 2. Research the topic
Even if it is a subject you know, take the time to brush up. Before speaking to your company’s sales directors about the new product your team developed, take the time to review the specifications so they are fresh in your mind.

3. Research the audience
You want to capture and hold the attention of the group as you speak. This will be easier to do if you know something about the audience. What are their interests? What questions might they want answered? How technical are they? Find out as much as you can and tailor your speech to the audience.

4.Write it down
Depending on the speech, you may write out the entire text of the speech or you may just jot down some notes on cards. Review what you write down and make sure it flows in a logical way. Fix it if it doesn’t.

5. Rehearse
Deliver your speech out loud to yourself and, if appropriate, to a few others. Do it out loud because the words always come out right in your head, but if you have to speak them you’ll catch some problems before hand. Then do it again. Keep doing it until you are comfortable.

6. Relax. You are ready
You have prepared for this speech so there is no need to be worried. You know the material and you know your audience. Now just go out and deliver a polished, rehearsed speech.

7. Find somewhere for your hands
Waving hands distract an audience. Find something do to with your hands. If there is a podium, rest them on it. One hand in your pocket can look okay, but both hands in your pockets looks bad. Hold papers (calmly) in one hand by your side, but don’t wave them around.

8. Smile
A smile on your face will make your audience respond more positively to you. It will also help you feel better. Obviously, if you are delivering a speech to your department that they are all getting laid off you don’t want to smile, but in almost every case it will help you.

9. Use appropriate humor
If you use a joke to open your speech, make sure it’s a good one. It should be funny without offending anyone. It helps to keep it as closely related to the topic as possible. And it should be new.

10. Share your enthusiasm
You are speaking about a subject you know. You are prepared. You are relaxed and smiling. Use this speech as a way to share with your audience your enthusiasm and it will be a fine speech.

Taken From: http://management.about.com/od/communication/ht/PublicSpeaking6.htm

Quote of the Day

“Here is a lesson in creative writing. First rule: Do not use semicolons. They are transvestite hermaphrodites representing absolutely nothing. All they do is show you’ve been to college.”
Kurt Vonnegut, A Man without a Country
US novelist (1922 – 2007)

Taken from: http://www.quotationspage.com/quote/39857.html

Language Humor

I thought I’d share these language-related funny cartoons. (See, this blog is not all about work ;-))

I’ve so felt like doing this sometimes

grammar teachers

Languages spice up our lives

(No Exit) Spice Up Your Life

Big-tongued?big tongue

Body language

palm reader